Peninsula Arts Contemporary Music Festival 2014: Thinking Music

Plymouth University
7-9 February 2014

Festival Directors:
Simon Ible, Director of Music, Peninsula Arts, Plymouth University
Eduardo Reck Miranda, Professor of Computer Music, Plymouth University


Free download: Thinking Music journal Download Journal

Peninsula Arts Contemporary Music Festival is firmly establishing itself as an important platform in the UK for new music exploring ideas emerging from leading edge research that is helping to pave the way for the music of the future.
Composers that make history have always taken risks and produced works that divided the opinions of the audiences of their time. This year's festival theme Thinking Music invites composers and performers to take risks, to venture into the unknown, and audiences to actively listen, open their minds and emotions to the unheard, and engage in the debate.

Thinking Music is allied to the project ‘Brain-Computer Music Interfacing for Monitoring and Inducing Affective States’ led by Prof Eduardo Miranda and Prof Slawomir Nasuto at the University of Reading’s Cybernetics Research Group, which is being funded by EPSRC. This year the Bergsen String Quartet will premiere Prof Miranda’s unprecedented new work, whereby brain signals from four people on stage will generate the parts to be performed by the quartet in real-time.

Thinking Music is also the title of Prof Miranda’s new book, which tells the inside story to the choral and orchestral work Sound to Sea. It describes in rich detail the concepts and processes with which the author engaged in the composition of the symphony. The book, which will be launched at the festival, includes the complete score and audio CD recording of the full live recording of the premiere at Plymouth’s Minster Church of St. Andrew by Ten Tors Orchestra with mezzo-soprano Juliette Pochin conducted by Simon Ible.

The festival programme is a showcase for Plymouth University composers Alexis Kirke, Duncan Williams, David Bessell, David Strang, Mike McInerney, and John Matthias. This year’s guest composer is Lithuanian Linas Baltas who will make his UK premiere with a new work AIR for two string orchestras to be performed by the festival’s resident ensemble, Ten Tors Orchestra.

The Festival will open with a new electronic work by Plymouth University composer Duncan Williams in response to Peter Randall-Page’s concurrent exhibition in both the Peninsula Arts Gallery and Plymouth City Museum & Art Gallery. Concord for Five Elements will be performed in the Peninsula Arts Gallery at the festival launch on 7 February. Peter Randall-Page is a renowned international artist based in Devon. His sculptures are inspired by interdisciplinary themes and the exhibition will be his first major retrospective in the South West for 25 years.


Peninsula Arts Contemporary Music Festival is promoted in partnership with the Interdisciplinary Centre for Computer Music Research


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Programme Overview:

Peninsula Arts Contemporary Music Festival 2014
Thinking Music

Friday 7 February

Crosspoint, Roland Levinsky Building | 18:30
Festival Launch
Festival Directors’ Simon Ible & Eduardo Miranda introduce this year’s festival themes and performances

Crosspoint, Roland Levinsky Building | 19:00
Computer music performance
Duncan Williams: Concord for Five Elements (2014)

Upper Lecture Theatre, Sherwell Centre | 20:00
Chamber Recital
Alexis Kirke: Remember a Day for solo voice, cello and electronics (2014)
Martyn Ware: Recapture (2014)

Saturday 8 February

Lecture Theatre 2, Roland Levinsky Building | 15:00
Alexis Kirke and Ian Sherriff: Public festival talk on the development and composition of Remember a Day (2014)

Crosspoint, Roland Levinsky Building | 17:30
Computer music performance (REPEAT)
Duncan Williams: Concord for Five Elements (2014)

Lecture Theatre 2, Roland Levinsky Building | 18:30
Book Launch
Eduardo Reck Miranda: Thinking Music (2014)

Theatre 1, Roland Levinsky Building | 19:30
Concert: Ten Tors Orchestra with Lauryna Sableviciute, piano conducted by Simon Ible
Eduardo R Miranda: Sounds from Underground prepared piano, computer-controlled electromagnets and strings (2014)
Eduardo R Miranda: Anathema for piano and string orchestra (2012 - 2014)
Linas Baltas: AIR for two string orchestras (2014)
David Bessell: Imprint for strings, four trombones and ring modulator (2014)
Ignacio Brasa: Zart for four trombones (2014)

Sunday 9 February

Crosspoint, Roland Levinsky Building | 13:00
David Strang and Sean Williams: Light Entropy (2014)

Upper Lecture Theatre, Sherwell Centre | 14:30
Chamber Concert: Bergesen String Quartet with Lauryna Sableviciute, piano
Eduardo R Miranda: Activating Memory for string quartet and brain-computer interface quartet (2014)
Stephen Davismoon: Glory Streams for piano and string quartet (2009)

Crosspoint, Roland Levinsky Building | 17:00
David Strang and Sean Williams: Light Entropy (2014) (REPEAT)

Theatre 1, Roland Levinsky Building | 18:00
Chamber Concert
The Logothetis Ensemble: Performing Imagined Noises

Theatre 1, Roland Levinsky Building | 20:00
Concert
John Matthias: Geisterfahrer (2013)


Programme Details:

Friday 7 February, Crosspoint, Roland Levinsky Building | 18:30
Festival Launch

Festival directors Simon Ible and Eduardo Reck Miranda introduce this year's festival.
Eduardo R. Miranda is a composer and a renowned researcher in the field of computer music. Currently, he is a Professor in Computer Music at Plymouth University, where he is head of the Interdisciplinary Centre for Computer Music Research (ICCMR). Prof Miranda is one of the founders of the Peninsula Arts Contemporary Music Festival, which he co-directs with Simon Ible. See Eduardo's full biography here
Simon Ible is Director of Music of Peninsula Arts, Plymouth University. He is Artistic Director and Conductor of the Ten Tors Orchestra and Musical Director of the University of Plymouth Choral Society. See Simon's full biography here

Friday 7 February, Crosspoint, Roland Levinsky Building | 19:00
Computer music performance
Duncan Williams: Concord for Five Elements (2014)
(Repeated Saturday 8th February | 17:30)

In Concord for Five Elements, Peter Randall-Page’s sculptures are represented by unique voices, synthesised from the ratio of vertices, edges, and faces of the sculptures themselves. These voices are established independently, before engaging with one another. Gradually, the voices ‘remember’ their sonic commonalities, ‘forget’ their differences, and end in concord.
 
Duncan Williams is a Research Fellow in Music with Artificial Intelligence at the Interdisciplinary Centre for Computer Music Research at Plymouth University.

Duncan holds a PhD in Psychoacoustics from the IoSR, University of Surrey, and joined Plymouth in 2012 from the music faculty at Oxford University. Previous projects include production and commercial composition for, amongst others, EMI Production Music, DeWolfe, and the Naxos label.

Friday 7 February, Upper Lecture Theatre, Sherwell Centre | 20:00
Chamber Recital
Alexis Kirke: Remember a Day for solo voice, cello and electronics (2014)

A collaboration with a group of volunteers with dementia, this piece utilizes prototype computer technology for auto-composing catchy memory tunes (think of the alphabet tune from school) to help those with dementia remember addresses, medication lists, etc. The collaborators’ tunes are incorporated into a performance for soprano, cello and electronics. The performance will be introduced by Ian Sherriff, trustee of the Alzheimer’s Society, a member of the Dementia Friendly Communities Champion Group which reports directly to the Prime Minister, and chair of Plymouth University Dementia Group. On the day after this premiere Ian and Alexis will give a public festival talk on the development and composition of Remember a Day.

This performance is a partnership between Peninsula Arts, Plymouth University Dementia Group, and Innovations in Dementia CIC.
 
Alexis Kirke is a permanent Research Fellow at the Interdisciplinary Centre for Computer Music Research and has two PhDs, one from Plymouth University Arts Faculty and one from Technology. He has worked as a Stock Market Analyst on Wall Street, and published articles and a book on Algorithmic Performance. Alexis’ work has been featured internationally on radio, TV and in print, and his talk invites have included the Royal Institution of Great Britain, a Goldsmiths College Whitehead Lecture, and BBC Research and Development to show his Peninsula Arts-commissioned film ‘many worlds’. Alexis’ music and performance sponsors include Barclays for the opera ‘Open Outcry’, Stanford University for his Peninsula Arts-commissioned ‘Cloud Chamber’ violin composition, and the Victoria and Albert Museum for the ‘Sonification of David Bowie’s Career’ (during the V&A’s record-breaking Bowie exhibition).

Friday 7 February, Upper Lecture Theatre, Sherwell Centre | 20:00
Chamber Recital
Martyn Ware: Recapture (2014)

Recapture is a composition based around the notion of how we reminisce and fondness for memories. Martyn will use computer processing to scramble famous old songs to within an inch of recognition, and intelligently recombine them into a 3D sound composition. Recapture will be gentle and affectionate, and will be hopefully another piece of the jigsaw to help discover the emotional significance of how we process music.
 
Martyn Ware was born in 1956 in Sheffield, UK. After leaving school he worked in computers for 3 years. In 1978 he formed The Human League. He formed the production company/label British Electric Foundation in 1980 and Heaven 17 the same year. As a record producer and artist he has featured on recordings totalling over 50 million sales worldwide - producing Tina Turner, Terence Trent D’Arby, Chaka Khan, Erasure, Marc Almond and Mavis Staples, etc. He founded Illustrious Co. Ltd. with Vince Clarke in 2000 to exploit the creative and commercial possibilities of their unique three-dimensional sound technology in collaboration with fine artists, the performing arts and corporate clients around the world. Martyn also lectures extensively on music production, technology, and creativity, and is a Visiting Professor and Honorary Doctor of Science at C4DM at Queen Mary College, University of London and a Fellow of the Royal Society for the Arts.

Saturday 8 February, Lecture Theatre 2, Roland Levinsky Building | 15:00
Alexis Kirke and Ian Sherriff: Public festival talk on the development and composition of Remember a Day

Ian Sherriff and Alexis Kirke give a public festival talk on the development and composition of Remember a Day.

This talk is a partnership between Peninsula Arts, Plymouth University Dementia Group, and Innovations in Dementia CIC.
 
Alexis Kirke is a permanent Research Fellow at the Interdisciplinary Centre for Computer Music Research and has two PhDs, one from Plymouth University Arts Faculty and one from Technology.

See full biography here
Ian Sherriff is trustee of the Alzheimer’s Society, a member of the Dementia Friendly Communities Champion Group which reports directly to the Prime Minister, and chair of Plymouth University Dementia Group.

Saturday 8 February, Lecture Theatre 2, Roland Levinsky Building | 18:30
Book Launch
Eduardo Reck Miranda: Thinking Music (2014)

The making of Sound to Sea revealed

Thinking Music tells the inside story to the choral and orchestral work Sound to Sea. It describes in rich detail the concepts and processes with which Eduardo Reck Miranda engaged in the composition of the symphony.

Sound to Sea alludes to voyages: voyages of discovery and exploration, and also voyages of the mind. The author contemplates the nature and practice of musical composition, and provides a personal account of his creative journey. He offers original insights into the art of composing in the 21st century, where scientific developments, and technologies of information and reproduction are transforming the way we think about creativity. Professor Miranda used his scientific knowledge and insight to develop methods for composing with the logic of processes in natural growth and evolution, computer simulations of neurones, and models of the human vocal tract. Excerpts from Charles Darwin's diary and Shakespeare's poetry mingle with allusions to Elgar, Mozart, and Stravinsky to form a fertile mosaic of scientific and cultural sources of inspiration for Sound to Sea.

Download press release here
 
Eduardo R. Miranda is a composer and a renowned researcher in the field of computer music. Currently, he is a Professor in Computer Music at Plymouth University, where he is head of the Interdisciplinary Centre for Computer Music Research (ICCMR). Prof Miranda is one of the founders of the Peninsula Arts Contemporary Music Festival, which he co-directs with Simon Ible.

See full biography here

Saturday 8 February, Theatre 1, Roland Levinsky Building | 19:30
Concert: Ten Tors Orchestra with Lauryna Sableviciute, piano conducted by Simon Ible

Lauryna Sableviciute began her piano studies at the age of 5, entering the M.K Ciurlionis School of Arts in Vilnius Lithuania, two years later, studying with Jurate Karosaite. She began to give public recitals at a very early age and by the time she was 15 had already accumulated many prizes and honours in various competitions including prestigious national awards from the Czech Republic and Lithuania. She graduated from the Vilnius Conservatoire in 1998 after having studied with Professor Birute Vainiunaite.

Some of her most memorable concerts include the performing of Vainiunas’ Piano Concerto together with the National Philharmonic Orchestra of Lithuania in 1991 (at the age of 15); in 1997 playing Schumann’s Piano Quintet Op.44 in E major with the Vilnius Quartet as part of the Young Talents of Lithuania season and in 1998 and performing Tchaikovsky’s Piano Concerto No.1 in B minor together with the National Philharmonic Orchestra of Lithuania in the Philharmonic Hall in Vilnius (the last two of these performances were also broadcast on national radio). In 2000 she entered the RSAMD to study for her Master’s in Music Performance, from where she graduated in 2003 having studied with Fali Pavri. In 2001 she won the RSAMD Governor’s Recital Competition for Piano.
 
Simon Ible is Director of Music of Peninsula Arts, Plymouth University. He is Artistic Director and Conductor of the Ten Tors Orchestra and Musical Director of the University of Plymouth Choral Society.

Simon studied conducting in Hanover with the German opera maestro, Klaus Donath and continued his conducting studies in London with Sir Colin Davis.

Simon spent almost 20 years performing and conducting in and around Bath where he was Artistic Director and Resident Conductor of Bath City Orchestra, directing the annual season or orchestral concerts in Bath ’s famous Pump Room, Guildhall and Assembly Rooms, and Assistant Conductor of the international Bath City Opera. He was also Musical Director of the Chandos Singers, Trowbridge Philharmonic Choral Society and the Bradford on Avon Choral Society.

Since moving to live in the Plymouth area in 1997 Simon’s freelance conducting posts have included East Cornwall Bach Choir, the Two Moors Festival Chorus and Two Moors Festival Opera, Peninsula Arts Chorale and Wells Festival Orchestra. Simon is a member of the ICCMR at Plymouth University.

Saturday 8 February, Theatre 1, Roland Levinsky Building | 19:30

Eduardo R Miranda: Sounds from Underground (2014)
for prepared piano, computer-controlled electromagnets and strings

Eduardo R Miranda: Anathema for piano and string orchestra (2012 - 2014)

Sounds from Underground (2014)

Piece in 3 movements for prepared piano, computer-controlled electromagnets and strings

I – Feelings Unheard of
II – Upheaval
III – Aftermath

The piece is inspired by a quote from Fyodor Dostoevsky’s book Notes from Undergound, from the mid of 1860s.

“Every man has reminiscences which he would not tell to everyone but only to his friends. He has other matters in his mind, which he would not reveal even to his friends, but only to himself, and that in secret. But there are other things which a man is afraid to tell even to himself, and every decent man has a number of such things stored away in is mind.”

Eduardo Miranda created a unique sonic vocabulary for this piece by exploring unusual ways of playing the instruments. Whereas some notes of the piano are muffled with earplugs inserted between the strings inside the instrument, other notes are played by means of magnetic resonators. Miranda teamed up with American engineer Andrew McPherson, to build an array of computer-controlled electromagnets that are placed inside of the piano to vibrate the strings. The electromagnets vibrate the strings of the piano independently of the hammers, affording new and yet beautiful sonorities on the piano, all controlled during the performance via a bespoke piece of software.

Sounds from Underground was developed in collaboration with pianist Luciane Cardassi, during a residency at Banff Centre, Canada partially supported by a grant from Plymouth University.
 
Eduardo R. Miranda is a composer and a renowned researcher in the field of computer music. He is Professor in Computer Music at Plymouth University, where he is head of the Interdisciplinary Centre for Computer Music Research (ICCMR).

Before moving to the University of Plymouth in 2003 he worked at Edinburgh Parallel Computing Centre (EPCC), University of Edinburgh, where he developed pioneering work on electronic music composition using parallel computers. He subsequently served as a Research Scientist at SONY Computer Science Laboratory - Paris, where he developed work on Artificial Intelligence applied to music and linguistics. In 2006 he was appointed Edgar Varèse Guest Professor of Computer Music at the Technical University of Berlin.

Prof Miranda’s compositions often embody the outcomes of his research on developing technologies for music and new approaches to composition. His music has been broadcast and performed worldwide, by renowned performers and ensembles such as Ian Pace (piano), Frances M Lynch(soprano), Mariona Sagarra (soprano), Luciani Cardassi (piano), Catarina Domenici (piano), Ney Rosauro (percussion), Chamber Group of Scotland, Scottish Chamber Orchestra (SCO), Orquestra Sinfônica de Porto Alegre (OSPA), BBC Concert Orchestra, and Ten Tors Orchestra.

Miranda has published over 120 research papers and is the author of the books Computer Sound Design: Synthesis Techniques and Programming (ISBN 0240516931), Composing Music with Computers (ISBN 0240515676), both published by Focal Press, and co-author of the book New Digital Musical Instruments: Control and Interaction Beyond the Keyboard, published by A-R Editions (ISBN 978-0-89579-585-4). A review of his solo CD Mother Tongue (Sargasso, London), in Wire reads "...These are immensely sophisticated pieces that constitute an electronic global music of convincingly organic simplicity."


Anathema
for piano and string orchestra (2012 - 2014)

This is a short intermezzo from Sound to Sea. The choral symphony Sound to Sea is the topic of the book Thinking Music, which will be launched at the festival - before the concert. It is something for the audience to connect with the book. Anathema was influenced by Igor Stravinsky’s music, more specifically by his Three Pieces for String Quartet. Stravinsky once mentioned that the second movement of this string quartet was inspired by a performance of a clown he had seen in London: “and the jerky, the ups and downs, the rhythm – even the mood or joke of the music – was suggested by the art of the great clown”. The composer pinched a couple of passages from Stravinsky’s quartet and gave them another context in Anathema, but tried to preserve the characteristic “mood” of the original piece.

Saturday 8 February, Theatre 1, Roland Levinsky Building | 19:30
Concert: Ten Tors Orchestra with Lauryna Sableviciute, piano conducted by Simon Ible

Linas Baltas: AIR for two string orchestras (2014)

AIR is a unique work for two string orchestras which is comprised of two previously discrete compositions, Nitrogen and Oxygen, by the same composer. The two pieces are performed at the same time by two independent string orchestras to create a synthesised work. The piece aims to sound fresh and enjoyable musically, whilst containing elements of conceptual and technical novelty in the transformation, concatenation, and synthesis which takes part in the "air" between the two orchestras.
 
Linas Baltas is a contemporary classical composer from Lithuania. He holds a DMA, MM, and BM in Music Theory and Composition from the Lithuanian Academy of Music and Theatre. His work as acomposer devotes a great deal of attention to the structural aspects of composition; however, his music is characteristic for its affective sound and is 'democratic' in its own way. Recent performances include Arc by the St. Christopher Chamber Orchestra, Swing and The Row, recorded by the Lithuanian National Symphony Orchestra, and Popcorn, performed by the Sinestesis ensemble.

Saturday 8 February, Theatre 1, Roland Levinsky Building | 19:30
Concert: Ten Tors Orchestra with Lauryna Sableviciute, piano conducted by Simon Ible
David Bessell: Imprint for strings, four trombones and ring modulator (2014)

Imprint is base on the idea of memory as an imprinting process. All the musical material is derived from two low trombone notes which are combined in various ways. These two notes are analysed in a computer to reveal only the frequencies that are common to the two notes. All the notes played by the strings are then derived from the resultant trombone frequencies. The trombone sounds are further imprinted on each other using a ring modulator to produce new sonorities. In the performance the extraordinary sound world is produced in real time using analogue technology rather than the more common computer audio processing.
 
David Bessel studied Orchestration with Julian Anderson, composition with Edwin Roxburgh at the Royal College of Music and composition with Simon Bainbridge at the Guildhall. Also studied jazz guitar with John Etheridge. His contemporary classical works have been performed both in the UK and internationally, at the South Bank, Princeton and various contemporary music festivals. Writings - on a range of contemporary music and technology related topics have been published by Wallflower Press, Oxford University Press and several leading academic music Journals (Computer Music Journal, Perspectives of New Music.) Popular music work has included session playing, arranging and programming for a long list of bands including Killing Joke, and Suede. In addition there has been sporadic popular music releases spanning twenty years under various names, the most notable of which is probably Node, an analogue synthesiser quartet which also featured well known producers Flood (U2, Depeche Mode, Nine Inch Nails, Nick Cave and the Bad Seeds, Sigur Ross, Polly Harvey etc etc!) Ed Buller (Suede, Pulp, Psychedelic Furs, Eric Clapton etc.) and Mel Wesson film music sound designer who works with Hans Zimmer on major Hollywood releases such as Da Vinci Code, Batman and Inception amongst many others. David Bessell is a lecturer in music at Plymouth University and research active member of the ICCMR.

Saturday 8 February, Theatre 1, Roland Levinsky Building | 19:30
Concert: Ten Tors Orchestra with Lauryna Sableviciute conducted by Simon Ible
Ignacio Brasa: Zart for four trombones (2014)

Zart is a game. It is an attempt at exploring the widest possible range of states and moods within the restrictions imposed by this instrumentation. It also represents an effort to see beauty in inhospitable surroundings.
 
Ignacio Brasa holds degrees in Piano Performance (Conservatoire of Salamanca, Spain), Musicology (University of Salamanca) and Advanced Musical Studies (University of London). Ignacio has been awarded a Brian Dennis Composition Prize, a Caja Espana Research Prize and a Santander Abbey International Scholarship of Academic Excellence. His compositions have been performed at festivals in Spain and the UK by specialist ensembles including Ossian, Chroma, and Counterpoise. He has recently completed a PhD in Composition under the supervision of Michael Finnissy at the University of Southampton, and is currently working as a piano accompanist at the Conservatoire of Burgos, Spain.

Sunday 9 February, Crosspoint, Roland Levinsky Building | 13:00
(Repeated Sunday 9th February | 17:00)
David Strang and Sean Williams: Light Entropy (2014)

Light Entropy is an installation and performance exploring ideas around decay, synaesthesia and chaos. The work has been developed around an original sound and light installation (Tiny Moments) by David Strang and built into a performance via the collaboration between David and Sean Williams.

Small light bulbs are frozen inside blocks of ice and hung at various points around a dark space. Beneath each block of ice is a metal bowl suspended in the space that catches each droplet of water as it falls. As a droplet of water hits the bowl it triggers the corresponding light to flash on then off. The water droplet is also amplified through speakers in the space. What is created here is a network of synchronised flashes of light and pulses of sound that adjust to the surrounding environment. Alongwith the light bulb, small contact mics are frozen in the blocks of ice to amplify the changing state of the ice as it cracks and releases small pockets of air.

Sean and David will interact with the running installation at particular points in the decaying cycle to play with and process the live sound. This includes the use of an arrangement of light bulbs as sound creating tools to generate rhythmic clicks and pulses of noise to create a live performance of sound and light.

The work explores the noise surrounding a moment or action. Before a light is triggered there is electromagnetic (EM) radiation that begins to build up and leaks from the system and after the light has triggered there is both the after image and after sound where the flash of light imprints onto the retina and the EM pulses fall away. Therefore, the work is built not just from the moment of light happening / triggering but also the fractions either side.
 
David Strang is an artist who works with sound and interactive elements. His work looks closely at the natural surroundings we live in and amplifies certain aspects to heighten our perception of space/place. Recent work includes site-specific installation, performance, field-recording, networks, re-appropriating media objects, hacking and noise. David works across multiple disciplines, such as architecture and sciences, exploring data to create artistic outputs. As part of his practice David runs various experimental workshops exploring aspects of sonic arts/hacking/sensor in a multi strand collaborative framework. These workshops are aimed at the transfer of knowledge throughout the group to create an artwork/performance/object in a few days.
He has collaborated and exhibited with artists and scientists as well as exhibiting solo work in the UK, Europe, Iceland, Russia and USA. He is a lecturer at Plymouth University and a member of the ICCMR.

Dr Sean Williams is a Leverhulme Early Career Research Fellow at the University of Edinburgh. An active performer using live electronics, he is a founder member of Grey Area and the Monosynth Orchestra playing original compositions, improvisations and existing pieces by Stockhausen, Wolff, Subotnik, Ono and others. He has also performed with Stephen Deazley's Music at the Brewhouse and the Red Note Ensemble. Sound art pieces have been shown I Edinburgh, Perth, Dundee, and at ZKM in Karlsruhe. He also enjoys playing records whenever and wherever the opportunity arises, at home, in performance, in seminars, in the Nevada desert, on the radio… and has produced a weekly radio show called Voice On Record on Resonance FM.

Sunday 9 February, Upper Lecture Theatre, Sherwell Centre | 14:30
Chamber Concert: Bergesen String Quartet with Lauryna Sableviciute, paino

The Bergersen Quartet is a dynamic string ensemble specialising in the performance and recording of music by living composers. Established in 2007, BQ is one of the UK’s leading contemporary ensembles. Promoting new music of all genres, the Quartet have had many works dedicated to them and have premiered more than 30 new works in the last year alone.

Lauryna Sableviciute began her piano studies at the age of 5, entering the M.K Ciurlionis School of Arts in Vilnius Lithuania, two years later, studying with Jurate Karosaite. She began to give public recitals at a very early age and by the time she was 15 had already accumulated many prizes and honours in various competitions including prestigious national awards from the Czech Republic and Lithuania. She graduated from the Vilnius Conservatoire in 1998 after having studied with Professor Birute Vainiunaite.

See full biography here
  The Bergersen Quartet
Lauryna Sableviciute

Sunday 9 February, Upper Lecture Theatre, Sherwell Centre | 14:30
Chamber Concert: Bergesen String Quartet with Lauryna Sableviciute, piano
Eduardo R Miranda: Activating Memory for string quartet and brain-computer interface quartet (2014)

Activating Memory is an innovative experimental composition for 8 performers: a string quartet and BCI-quartet. The BCI-quartet involves four persons wearing a brain cap furnished with electrodes to read information from the brain. Eduardo Miranda teamed up with g.tec, manufacturer of biomedical technology, and Joel Eaton at ICCMR to design an extraordinary machine that converts brain information into musical scores. During the performance, the BCI-quartet will generate musical scores to be performed by the string quartet in real-time. Each member of the BCI-quartet will generate a part for a musician of the string quartet. This is the first time ever that such a futuristic system will be revealed to the public.
GTEC EPSRC
 
Eduardo R. Miranda is a composer and a renowned researcher in the field of computer music. Currently, he is a Professor in Computer Music at Plymouth University, where he is head of the Interdisciplinary Centre for Computer Music Research (ICCMR).

See full biography here
Joel Eaton is a PhD student at the Interdisciplinary Centre for Computer Music Research, University of Plymouth.

Joel works as a freelance sound engineer, media consultant, educationalist and developer, and has published widely on topics including Brain Computer Musical Interfacing, real-time notation, metadata and file digitization.

Sunday 9 February, Upper Lecture Theatre, Sherwell Centre | 14:30
Chamber Concert: Bergesen String Quartet with Lauryna Sableviciute, piano
Stephen Davismoon: Glory Streams for piano and string quartet (2009)

Glory Streams for Piano and String Quartet; commissioned by the Edinburgh Quartet, and featuring the pianist Lauryna Sableviciute, received its premiere performance at Greyfriars Kirk, Edinburgh 13th December 2009. Glory Streams was funded by the Scottish Art Council and Edinburgh Napier University.
 
Stephen Davismoon is Professor of Contemporary Composition at the University of Salford. He has written for a wide variety of media: solo instrumental; chamber; orchestral; vocal and electroacoustic/sound installation works he has had performances of his work in Brazil, Canada, Finland, France, Germany, Holland, Iceland, Italy, Lithuania, Spain, Switzerland, UK, Ukraine, Uruguay and the USA. Many of his works combine traditional/acoustic instruments/voices with real-time/interactive electronic transformations. His use of live/interactive electronics in his work commonly consists of subtle, complex and dynamic systems, sensitive to the dynamic, rhythmic and harmonic gestures of the ‘live’ performer(s) seeking to enhance – complementarily - the performance and listening space. Ideas and techniques from the fields of emergent and generative computing consistently appear throughout his work.

Sunday 9 February, Theatre 1, Roland Levinsky Building | 18:00
Chamber Concert
The Logothetis Ensemble: Performing Imagined Noises (circa 1960/2014)

The Logothetis Ensemble is an Anglo-German electro-acoustic quartet specialising in faithful performances of the scores of the Viennese visionary composer Anestis Logothetis (1921 - 1994). These images start from Western traditions of musical notation but expand outwards into feasts of virtuosic penmanship. As scores, they identify every aspect of the musical work which accompanies them while remaining open to new technological developments.

As interpreters, the Logothetis Ensemble work with technology and occasional invented instruments to build an expanded soundworld that fulfils the score’s requirements and is effective in performance. Each of the pieces in this project has as its starting point a score by Anestis Logothetis but the music that you hear was developed by the ensemble using their own sonic resources. As each piece is performed, the appropriate drawing is projected on the screen above. The result is a democratic hybrid, initiated by a visionary composer between 1960 and 1978 but unique to the ensemble and only playable with today’s resources. s an Anglo-German electro-acoustic quartet specialising in faithful performances of the scores of the Austrian visionary composer Anestis Logothetis.

The ensemble will be performing:
Ghia tin Ora (1975)
Fantasmata (1961)
Enklaven (1967)

 
The Logothetis Ensemble:
Richard Douglas-Green,
Werner Durand,
Mike McInerney,
Michael Neil

Richard Douglas-Green trained as a sound engineer with the BBC before becoming a radio producer and TV Director in Plymouth and the South West. Since 2005 he has worked as a freelance sound recordist and artist, applying the techniques of studio production and broadcast engineering to the creation and dissemination of new sound art.

Werner Durand performs music for saxophones, Iranian ney, and self-made wind instruments. He started to build wind instruments out of plexiglass and PVC in the early 80s. Werner has collaborated with numerous composers/performers including David Behrman, John Driscoll, David Moss, Muslimgauze, Henning Christiansen, David Toop and the visual/ sound artist Rolf Julius. A variety of materials and playing techniques enables him to bring out unusual sounds, rich textures and rhythmic ideas that might recall tribal music from Africa or the Pacific but which at the same time sound experimental, and even (post-)industrial.

Mike McInerney plays piano and Japanese shakuhachi flute as interfaces with new technology. As a composer, he combines open form scores with acoustic recordings and analog synthesis to create works for live electro-acoustic performance. His work has been performed at Plymouth New Music Festival (2007, 2009, 2011 and 2012), Spitalfields Winter Festival (2012), Notting Hill Mayfest (2013), Sonic Arts' EXPO Leeds (2009), Noise=Noise 17 (2010) and Teufeslberg Heri-Tage (2012). Dr McInerney is a lecturer in music with Plymouth University.

Michael Neil is an English electronic composer now resident in Berlin with a release catalogue of more than twenty albums to his credit. He plays synthesizers, MIDI interfaces with music software and samples from natural and synthetic sources in order to interact with conventional and non-conventional instruments and their performers. He also works closely with the visual arts to help redefine the role of music in the context of visual practices, graphic scores and pitch determinants such as map co-ordinates and topographical data.

Sunday 9 February, Theatre 1, Roland Levinsky Building | 20:00
Concert
John Matthias: Geisterfahrer (2013)

John Matthias' new album, Geisterfahrer is released on the Village Green Label in January 2014 and will be the main focus of this performance. Geisterfahrer includes the new works written and performed by John Matthias and Andrew Prior for the new dance-theatre work, Eden by Company Chameleon, choreographed by Jonathan Goddard and Gemma Nixon. Eden portrays an insular and inner world and the score uses minimal piano and violin melodies interspersed with the sounds triggered by firing artificial neurons using the Neurogranular Sampler, and instrument developed at Plymouth University with John Matthias, Jane Grant, Tim Hodgson, Nick Ryan, Kin Design and Eduardo Miranda over the last 5 years.

The rest of the Geisterfahrer album is written and performed by John Matthias and was recorded in two days at a 600 year-old school in Ashburton, Devon, and the amazing acoustic of this space has been reproduced onto all of the other tracks by producers, Simon Honywill and Jay Auborn. The album will be re-created live at the Plymouth Contemporary Music Festival together with material from John Matthias' previous albums Smalltown, Shining and Stories from the Watercooler.
 
John Matthias is a musician, composer and physicist. In 2008, he won the PRS Foundation New Music Award (The 'Turner Prize' for music) with Jane Grant and Nick Ryan for the development of a huge sonic installation across the UK entitled The Fragmented Orchestra' He has released three albums; Smalltown, Shining' (Accidental Records 2001), Stories from the Watercooler' (Ninja Tune 2008), Cortical Songs' (Nonclassical 2008) with Nick Ryan, which includes remixes by Thom Yorke, Simon Tong and Jem Finer and was listed as one of the top ten classical albums by Time Out (Chicago) in 2009. He has collaborated with many recording artists including Radiohead and Coldcut and has performed extensively including at the Wordless Music Series in New York, The Pompidou Centre in Paris and at Shepherd’s Bush Empire in London. He has recently collaborated with artist, Stanley Donwood in San Francisco, the Rambert Dance Company with Nick Ryan in London and Andrew Prior and Company Chameleon in their new contemporary dance-theatre work, Eden which had its London Premier in 2013 at the Royal Opera House, Covent Garden. He is Associate Professor in Sonic Arts at Plymouth University and is co-director of the Art and Sound research group in the School of Art and Media. He has a Ph.D in Theoretical Physics from Exeter University.


for programme details from previous years events click here